Apple’s clever strategy for forcing partners to use Face ID

When Apple announced the iPhone X last week, the most sophisticated (and widely predicted) feature revealed was the facial recognition approach, called Face ID. But by choosing to go all or nothing with the iPhone X — it’s only Face ID, with no support for Touch ID — the big risk for Apple was that all the companies that support Touch ID in their apps wouldn’t quickly make the move to Face ID. So Apple made the decision for them.

As the recent healthcare debate in the U.S. demonstrated, it’s extremely hard to take back something people have grown to like. Apple’s choice of biometric authentication faced the same problem. If Amazon, Chase, Fidelity or any of the other major companies whose apps use Touch ID as a way to log in without a password had failed to make the move to Face ID, their customers would have been forced to go back to typing in long passwords. Apple, ever mindful of customer experience, chose to not permit that to happen. To make sure that companies use Face ID in their apps, Apple simply didn’t give them any practical choice.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more 0 Comments

Angular 5 JavaScript framework delayed

Angular 5, the next version of the popular Google-developed JavaScript framework, was to have debuted this month. But the release is now set to arrive October 23, because Google needs more time to work on the upgrade process.

As a result of Angular 5’s delay, Angular 6 should arrive in March or April 2018, followed by Angular 7 in September or October 2018. Each version is promised to be backward-compatible with the prior release.

Angular 5’s promised capabilities include building progressive web apps as well as a build optimizer and accommodations for Material Design components.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more 0 Comments

5 top ways to run Windows on a Mac

Other than a few interesting years in the mid-2000s, Apple’s approach to the enterprise market has been one of benign neglect. The one exception, starting in 2005, has been consistent support for running Windows on Macs.

By now, the practice is well-established. But the issue of management still looms large. How can IT deploy Macs that run Windows without multiplying the complexity (and cost) of deployment, maintenance and security by at least a factor of two? The enterprise question that vendors are now addressing in a variety of interesting ways is, “How can we make Macs running Windows securely maintainable components of the IT infrastructure and ecosystem?”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more 0 Comments